Create an Indoor Jungle

(Photo from helloglow.com)

1. Spider plant – Fights pollutants, moderate light and will usually produce babies.

2. Snake Plants – Doesn’t require a lot of sun or water to survive.

3. Bamboo Palm – Indirect sun with healthy amounts of water. Takes in harmful chemicals like benzene.

4. Aloe – Lots of sun, helps heal scars and sunburns. Cool little fact: Aloe will start to get brown spots in an unhealthy area.

5. Philodendron – Easy to grow with moderate sunlight. Absorbs the chemical xylene.

6. Mint – High light, pinch off regularly to promote growth. Edible & especially if your a Mojito lover 😉

7. Ivy – Absorbs formaldehyde and is the number one air-filtering plant.

8. Boston Fern – Awesome foliage and a great air purifier. Bright indirect light. I love these because they are constant reminders of the forest.

9. Cast-Iron Plant – Moderate light, Easy care. “Tolerant of neglect*

10. Dracaenea – Wicked cool plant. Needs lots of sun but can grow 15 ft tall!

11. Succulents – Succulents are so fun and popular right now. Easy to care for, high light, little water.

(Photo from beckiowens.com)

Rubber plants – Thrive in dim light, purify the air.

Rubber Plant

(photo from sarahledonne.com)

Peace lily – Cooler and low light easy maintenance.

Peace lily

(photo from aprilandmay.com)

Golden Pothos – Another formaldehyde absorbing plant.

(photo from Atilio)

* Reminder formaldehyde is used in lots of building materials. There could be some in your living environment, I recommend having this plant around to help with the quality and it will live for years if cared for properly. *

Success story

I have a Momma Aloe and by Momma I mean she spouts off lots of little pups. These little offshoots and I have had to establish a relationship based on what they are communicating.

For example.

I cut them from their host and planted them. I did two things wrong.

1. I didn’t let their roots callus for a couple days and

2. I put them in direct sun.

As I watched them for a couple days they started to turn this sickly green color. Alarmed that they were dying, I took them out, let them dry and callus for almost a week then re-planted them. Over the next couple of days, they started to look better.

But then I noticed the green sickly color again. So I moved half of them to a windowsill that faces the west. Alas, they finally perked up and went back to their natural color indicating to me that they were happy and well, fit to give as gifts to friends and family.

Pat on the back for finding success over trial and error 🙂

I’m working on cultivating an urban indoor jungle while embracing the clean air as a result. There are ton’s of super awesome designers, lovers of plants and really cool people to follow for inspiration. The wishing tree has a beautifully written article on the revival of houseplants and why to decorate with them.

Instagram accounts for Inspiration:

@houseplantclub

@foliacollective

@theoperatingsystem 

@conservatory_archives

Sources:

Huffington Post

Balcony Gardener

Epic Gardening

The Spruce

 

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.